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Currently wearing Hoka's but only because they felt good and seem to fit my foot. Seems like every time I find a shoe that feels great...........the company upgrades their shoes and I do not get the same fit and comfort. And then the search begins for arch support, wide toe box and a low cut around the ankle!!! Might try Reabok next time around.........I just bought my crossfit shoes from them and they are a super fit. Old company!!!!

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I have high insteps and get severe pain after a few hours on the trail (sorry about the move off road here, used to do road all the time). Hoka speedgoats are the talk of the trail town though so I thought I should try them. Long story short, they were worse than regular middlingly cushioned shoes. Maybe they made my foot bend too much with all the squishiness. So I’m back to low drop inov8s.

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Oct 21, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I like lightweight with cushioning. My longtime favorites were Nike Flyknit, but once I got over six or seven miles my feet hurt, not much cushion. So I gave in and tried Hoka. I tried a couple different models that ended up being better for walking or working, and now I run in Rincon. They do wear faster but I have total comfort for long distance. I think I have owned every color of Rincon 1 Rincon2 and now working my way thru Rincon 3. See you in Richmond.... In my Hokas.

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Coincidentally, my current racing shoes are Hokas (and yes, I love them) but have not chosen them because of the brand, but rather as they provided the best feeling when I went for new shoes.

That's what I always do, pick the ones with best feeling and support. And such have ran with many brands. Often they change their foot support with a new model so it doesn't align with my needs.

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Oct 21, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I’ve loved Saucony in the past. Then, I’ve loved ASICS Cumulus and Nimbus. Now, I use Brooks Ghost because the heel-to-drop is 12mm, high enough to protect my Achilles chronic issue. I just checked the Hoka’s website and they only seem to have low drops. I guess I’ll stick to Brooks for now.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I would venture to put forth 2 reasons for HOKA rise. Having spent a lot of time in doctors offices and hospitals, I can say they are very popular with the staff from engineering to nursing for their comfort. Second with the end of Covid has comes a resurgence of adult fitness and comfort of Hoka fits well with recreational fitness. I wore Hoka’s until sciatic forced me out of drop shoes. Altra’s zero drop and wide toe box by orthopedic suggestion. However Saucony Kinvana 13 is my new speed shoe with a 4mm drop, no long runs that what the Torin is for.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

Ten years ago I had horrible plantar fasciitis, Hokas saved me and have been part of my running shoe collection ever since.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I had been running in Brooks since they put an upper on a tire tread (Villanovas). However, as I aged, I found that the Adrenaline were the perfect shoe for up to 1/2 marathons and the Beast for the full marathons. Then they went to softer shoes and got rid of the medial post. I could not run more than 5 miles without discomfort in the "new" Adrenalines or Beasts. After they transitioned I was able to stock up on some old Beasts, but when they wore out I was in a pickle. After lots of research, I found the New Balance 860s! Now I can do the longer runs again. The constant change to "improve" the shoes is quite irritating as one cannot depend on a specific shoe that works for them.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I like the New Balance 840s. Considering my age and complaints, I am comfortable at the end of a run with these shoes. I had struggled to find a pair that worked!! Unfortunately, they have restyled it... 😠🤦🏼‍♀️ They have joined the 0 drop platform shoe craze. I. Just. Can't.

I have hoarded several pairs of the original 840s, hope they last. 🤞🏻

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

Wow! Lots of responses! I stick with Merrell Vapor Glove Version 3 through 5. Love my 5s. They fit, they are comfortable. I have maybe 2, 3 pairs and some waiting to be worn. What more could one want. I'm basically a barefoot runner, even went to no socks. Crazy I know, but that is me. I've tried to like the others. . Altras, Asics, New Balance. They just do not work.

Minority. . . oh, well!! I've have to wear something that fits on my foot. This fits the bill, so it is what I do!

Foggy, in the 60s. That's Oregon for you! :)

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I am going to be a little off-topic and answer this generically. My favorite running shoes are the ones that fit. I will admit that I do like my Hoka's Clifton's for longer distances on pavement. For the shorter (under 6 miles) distance I prefer my New Balance Rebels, which I now need to replace. As for all-out trail running, I prefer using Altra's (which are going to be replaced as well).

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I would love to try Hokas. They look wonderfully comfortable. Sadly they don't make 'em in my size (16EE). I've found New Balance Fresh Foam to be a nice alternative, in my case the Vongo but the 1080s are nice too.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I was always a Nike Pegasus person but two years back i started experimenting w/ ASICS (gel nimbus) and brooks (Ghost). Am convinced that the year long plantar fasciitis had something to do with the extra cushioning of brooks - everything started improving when I went back to Nike. Now I only wear the Pegasus 39 and 40 for runs and the brand new ASICS have become walking shoes

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2 of the best I've tried are:

- Saucony Triumph 20. Possible top of the list.

- Puma velocity Nitro 2. Not very popular in the US, but what a workhorse.

I tried 2 Hokas, they get wornout way too fast..

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As a long time runner I can say I've tried and like a lot of running shoes but got turned off when they decided to cheapen them up or I found something better.

I ran in Asics Gel Nimbus until they narrowed the toe box.

I changed to Brooks Ghost and bought two pair that I still wear.

Then I got hooked on the pricy Nike AlphaFly's... the soft padding and the kickback you get from the carbon plate propelled me to cut my race times whenever I wore them. It felt like I was running on air and I wore the hell out of them until I destroyed the the rear padding. To date I've purchased three pair and everyone is right, you don't get a lot of miles out of them. Now when I watch the major marathons, I look to see what their wearing. Almost to a runner they've all switched to what I now call the Super Shoes and watched the finishing times drop. There have been three shoes outlawed for major marathons but the top runners, with shoe endorcements, find a way around that with custom shoes. Only one rummer has run a marathon under two hours and the flat course was set up to optimize a faster time. My wife went to a running store and after trying various shoes walked out with a pair of Hoka's. She doesn't run but wanted knee support. Will I try Hoka's? Maybe after I wear out my Nike's. My budget can only take a hit like that every so often because I rotate shoies every time.

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Also for road running I have Asics gel-Kayano shoes

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I was a Hoka pioneer 10 years ago during the minimalist craze. I got laughed at a lot by people wearing shoes with individual toes. (Now who’s laughing?) I currently have three pairs. One for racing, one for treadmill training, and one for walking around.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I'd love recs for trail running shoes!

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If it weren't for Hokas, I don't think I could have run two marathons. I am in my 60's. So I am very grateful for Hoka.

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I started to wear Hokas in 2014 when I had knee issues and was doing a research for shoes and came across this blog from an ultra marathoner who recommended them. I gave them a try and never looked back.

They didn't have many different model options back then.

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I've tried Hoka's twice, and I just can't get into them. Somehow the sheer amount of cushion really throws off my stride! I LOVE Saucony though and am pretty loyal to their Peregrine (trail runners) and Ride (road runners) series. I've run / hiked hundreds of miles in each and they've been super comfortable.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

There's been some talk of inserts here, and I'm gonna jump in and ask in case someone here knows: If you switch to an entirely different insert, how does that impact what kind of shoe to buy? Since you're then mostly looking at the exterior...

For reference, I've been wearing Brooks Adrenalines for years, even before I started running regularly. I have very high arches, so the running shop I did my fitting with recommended them for the support. They have always performed well for me, but I noticed I was wearing them out VERY unevenly, which led me to getting fitted for orthotics and seeking out some coaching to help me even out my running gait. Now, I will ONLY run with my custom orthotics in place, but that has had me wondering if I still need to stick with the Adrenalines... I think probably because of the guide rail system, but I'm ignorant of other options!

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

Brooks Ghost for years, now Brooks Glycerin for a little more cushioning.

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Not me but I loved the book and recommend it to any one who thinks entrepreneurship is easy… amazing that Nike exists in my opinion.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I bought my first Hokas this summer to hike the TMB, Goat GTX trailrunner. They were wonderful. Didn't have to break them in, foot felt supported, great shoes. By the time I completed it, 8 days, the shoes had shredded along the sides and the bottom vibram sole was coming off. Granted they were put through rocky hiking. Hoka took them back without question. If I knew this was a one time thing I would have reordered a second pair but now it seems from what I'm reading it is an issue. I run in Brooks Dyads and have for years and love them but for whatever reason one heel bone digs a really big hole in EVERY right shoe! If it wasn't for the plastic heel cup my heel bone would probably push through! But that's a ME problem lol.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

My hubby prefers Hokas. I prefer Altras!

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I tried to hop on the Hoka train last year, but the Clifftons gave me some shin pain. Now I'm liking my Nike Pegasus 39s, nothing fancy but they feel relatively fast and are supportive enough for long runs.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I have tried out a handful of brands over the years but always go to Newton for training and racing!

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I’ve been a Hoka girl since 2019 when I started having knee problems when running. With Hokas, I was able to go from running in a knee brace to running without one and no pain!

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I switched to the Hoka Clifton in 2019 and haven't looked back. I was previously in the Saucony Guide, which I loved. However after I got custom orthotics I no longer needed a stability shoe. Unfortunately I found that out while running the NYC marathon in 2018 where I developed horrible foot and ankle pain halfway through the race. I find that I can get around 400 miles out of a pair of Cliftons where I would only get about 300 out of the Guides. Yes, the outsole is pretty worn, but the cushioning still feels good and my legs don't feel beat up like they did after the Guides had around 300 miles on them. I have also tried the Hoka Rincon and the Carbon X 3. I like those as well and run in them here and there, but mostly rely on my Cliftons for the majority of my runs. I feel that the cushioning is just right but is also a bit springy and responsive. They never feel "mushy" or bog down my stride. They are also pretty light despite the higher foam stack. So, unless they drastically change the shoe, I don't plan to change to anything else anytime soon.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

i wear brooks launch and adrenaline. lately they are hurting my left big toe though so i may switch to something else.

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I rock the Hokas and felt like I was giving in to being old when I started, but I like em. That crazy-thick sole really helps with back pain for general exercise and walking.

I'm on my third pair!

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I switched to Hokas about 4 years ago. It was a game changer on making my feet not hurt. I am not a fast runner, I call myself a slogger (slow jogger), so they are perfect for me. I am open to new ones, I just haven't tried any other ones out yet.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

There was the 0 drop craze, neutral shoe that started 10 years ago. I land on my mid some. Altra, like the last comment, are 0 drop minimal shoes - great shoe. But wasn’t for me. I was prescribed Hoka because of foot pain. They are overly cushioned shoe and have a good roll off. Hokas are very good if you are heavy too and a heal striker. They have a carbon plate that helps to snap back after push off. But the drawback on the Hoka shoe is they wear too fast, you need to buy new a ones every two months. They are pricey.

But I stick to a minimal low drop neutral show. I like to feel the road. I like a good shoe that has a good roll off. I’m wearing Addidas Supernova. I’m open to try new shoes too when it’s time. My feet let me know when I new new shoes. You should be changing out your running shoes every 300-500 miles. Thats possibly every 4 months. They look new, but the soles flatten. Shoes are very important!!

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Oct 20, 2023·edited Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I bought them to try them out last spring. For running? a big no. Way too unstable for my knees. But walking and hiking? Definitely. The cushion is great for long walks on asphalt.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I was pushed towards Hoka last time I went in for shoes - they were nice in the short term, but didn’t last nearly as long as I would’ve hoped. I also notice they do a ton of promotional events with my local group & are really popular with casual/non-runners. I stick with Brooks, which seem to hold up for a long while and work on a good variety of terrain.

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

I have the Hokas you show in your photo.

As a walker (former runner) with multiple foot fractures, RA and balance issues these shoes really helped me get out 7 days a week for brisk walks of 3-4 miles at age 72. Not only do I wear them for walks, but leave them on until bedtime.

I realize they make me look like a platypus, but I toddle on, toddle on!

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Oct 20, 2023Liked by Terrell Johnson

Still Brooks. They utterly ruined the design of the Adrenaline GTS, which in 2010 was the best, most robust running shoe in the world IMO. I was sourcing unworn or barely worn pairs of the 2010 (GTS X) model off ebay for yearssss. And I'd put up to 1500 training miles on a single pair. After 2013 the design went utterly to shit, totally crap shoe with ruined toebox and mucked up heel, do not buy. But I've moved to the Launch GTS as sort of the replacement shoe - a little less beefy than the Adrenalines, and I'm more cautious about overuse these days, so would tend to retire after 500-600 miles of loft compression even though they still look great and don't blow out. But even so, no shoe in the world fits my foot and gives support like their shoes. I wish I could do Hokas but the stack, shape from heel-midfoot-toebox and support aren't the same. Brooks have been my running shoes since the mid 2000s and I also thru'd the PCT in them in 2022. Wish they'd stop tinkering with the designs though.

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I hope someone writes a version of Shoe Dog for Hoka. It might be a fascinating story. I guess Hoka first appealed to the American market for those who loved cushy, soft landings. And they did this soo well, word of mouth did the rest. Then Hoka refined their offerings to appeal more to runners and have done exceptionally well. I’m with you T. Not a fan of shoe technology that assists in running faster times beyond the weight of the shoe. Old school…I am!

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I've been running in Altra Torins for about 4 years now and I wouldn't wear any other shoe. I recently got full-bed inserts for a bit more arch support and that has made all the difference in my recovery.

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